Avenues of Honour

Avenues of Honour

Avenues of Honour

AVENUES OF HONOUR to commemorate the fallen created the beginning of cultural landscape peculiar to Australia. At least 128 Avenues of Honour were planted throughout Victoria between 1917 and 1921, the majority concentrated in the Central Highlands.
BEACONSFIELD AVENUE OF HONOUR - Originally planted in 1929 with 123 trees; now reduced to 118. Initiated by local philanthropist Miss Ada Armatage of Holm Park. 
The trees are Black Poplars. 
 
WILSON & SCANLON STREETS - Approx. 35 English and Pin Oaks planted in September 1917. 
Co-ordinated by the Berwick Progress Association with donations by Berwick residents of trees & tree-guards. Gaps between the trees have been filled in over the years. 
 
CHURCH STREET - English & Pin Oaks planted in 1919, these with the memorial plaque, commemorate the nine boys from Berwick Grammar School who were killed in the World War 1 and one in the Boer War. 
 
HARKAWAY ROAD - Significantly, this Avenue is planted with Red Gums, the natives chosen by the local community to represent the national pride that evolved from Australian participation in the War. 

29 trees were planted, though some originals have since been replaced with oaks. The memorial stone was unveiled on Anzac Day 1959. 
 
MEMORIAL DRIVE, NARRE WARREN NORTH - 60 English Oaks were planted in this Avenue, which was officially opened September 1919 - the result of a community project, which involved working bees and donations, as well as afternoon teas provided by the ladies.